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and jim demint has been talking about with internal circumstances, credibility of the research, the numbers are adjusted or fixed, the minute you do that you know your intellectual adversaries, we know your friends have gone over the line again. we knew that was the very first place that had to be covered and had to start sticking our issues carefully and some of those, i will never forget there will be an expansion of medicare proposed by senator ted kennedy that should be reason enough to have opposed it. we looked up the numbers and said this is in the $2 billion increase they say it is going to be. it will be closer to $10 billion. fear the good friends in the congressional budget office, send it over to the congressional budget office, they did, the congressional budget office came back and said the number was a little more. they justified our number, this president finished the number and said to people maybe we can rely on it and mandate leadership came along and fooled that story and told it so well in the first paragraph. >> what release strikes me in writing about exp
'm debra norville. >> stephanie: how about you jim? >> i'm katie couric. >> stephanie: what a news day yesterday. poor wolf blitzer. they'll have to leave it there. can you tell his accent from the surveillance video? what how would you be able to tell his accent from his surveillance video? >> were you able to see think pass port from the surveillance video. >> stephanie: the suspect was not arrested in the boston bombing, and he clearly was not darked skinned . oh other than that -- >> if he had been arrested he would have been dark skinned. >> stephanie: you remember hurricane katrina, we have done this with aisha tyler before. this is what happens when anchors have to fill time jim. oh, jack, look at all of those people, so hungry so poor so black. [ laughter ] [ wah wah ] >> stephanie: oh yes he did. it has provided all of the comedy fodder for aisha tyler and her husband, because she says literally at lunch every day she says i'm so hungry so black. [ applause ] >> stephanie: it's like a matinee performance every date their house. and there is a consolation
suspect's trip back home in 2012. tracking that for us, in some really heated testimony today, cnn's jim acosta. jim? lay out the information for us. what's being said? what is the controversy? >> reporter: well, chris, you're absolutely right, lawmakers on capitol hill are trying to get to the bottom of what was known about the older suspect who is now dead, tamerlan tsarnaev, and this trip ta hat he took to rusa last year. law makes want to know why is it that tamerlan tsarnaev was able to make this trip in the first place. should he have been stopped before he went overseas? when overseas what did he do? what was he up to when he was over there? some of this is stemming from some of the conflicting stories, quite frankly, chris, from federal officials over tamerlan tsarnaev's status. senator lindsey graham, republican from south carolina, told reporters yesterday that tamerlan was on a no-fly list, that he was on some sort of terror watch list a federal law enforcement official has told cnn that is not the case. and senator charles grassley, graham's republican colleague in the senate
and a house committee is set to look whether or not it should actually continue. chief correspondent jim angle is live in washington with more. hi, jim. >> reporter: hello, jenna. what started out as an effort to by ronald reagan to help people in rural areas to have a phone in case of emergencies what critics suspect is a new welfare program, listen. >> the cost has gone from $143 million a few years ago, to $2.2 billion today, a 15 times increase. >> reporter: now the cost of the program lept after cell phones were added in 2008. only those on low income programs such as welfare and food stamps legally qualify. but lawmakers say the program is out of control. >> i got a solicitation for a free phone at my apartment which is certainly not in a building where you're going to have people who are qualified for free phones. there is clearly money being wasted here. >> the fcc said in a recent year there were 270,000 beneficiaries that had more than one of these subsidized cell phones that is completely against the law right there. >> reporter: now funded by a small tax on all phone bills you can
are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >>> welcome back to "squawk". jim is standing by at the cme in chicago. you've got the numbers. >> the numbers 352. and the claims number 368 on the continuing claims. it's about kind of where it is. the revision from last week up 2,000. so it's right kind of as expected. this was the big number. independent of last week's claims numbers over of last three weeks claims have been a big deal. they have indicated some sort of spring swoon. this is an indication how severe it is going to be. from the looks, it's not that big a deal. stock market up from that. these numbers came out as expected, which is not bad compared to two weeks ago. >> thank you for that. we've got reaction from steve liesman. are the numbers as positive as jim was portraying them? >> it's interesting, andrew. we have yet to see confirmation of that weak jobs report come up in the jobless claims. we have a speak up, some of it. now it has settled down back into that 350,000 range. you would think if it deteriorated as much as it has you would see som
with jim davis, executive director of the colorado department of public safety. he's also chair of the national governor's association homeland security advisors council. among big events he's worked on was the 2008 democratic national convention in denver. and ed cannon, currently of t&m protection resources, a private security consulting firm. he was formerly an assistant chief of the new york city police department, and helped set up security for that city's marathon and many other events. well, jim davis, starting with you, how does boston change things for people in your position? what kinds of discussions are going on now? >> well, certainly we're much more focused on security. you know, in the united states we've got pretty short memories and i think after 9/11 we were very focused on security and then things kind of we'd go through a time period where we don't a lot of attacks or any successful attacks and now boston happens and people get focused on it again. i think that in the -- in law enforcement and intelligence community we've always been focused on it but people
afternoon. to help us through the issues of the day today ambassador jim jones, former u.s. ambassador to mexico will be here in studio with us. igor volsky, of course here as he is every tuesday from think progress and a very exciting guest today and an unusual guest, randy couture a former mma boxing star, a boxing star and an mma star and a great actor, too. extenders? >> expendables. i think he's a chump and i'm going to tell him that to his face. >> bill: he will crush you! >> you're probably right. >> bill: he will crush you. >> you're definitely right! >> bill: i have a friend who wrestled with him. >> no kidding! >> bill: he told him didn't stand a chance. flattened him out. >> if you're not familiar with randy, go online and do a google image search for him. >> bill: i'm afraid of him already. >> there are a lot of pictures of him with his shirt off. he is chilled out of rock. >> bill: i'm afraid of him already. i'm going to have cyprian come in and stand alongside of me. >> your body guard? [ laughter ] perfect. >> bill: all right. and yes indeed, they're whining about air tr
promise to try it find it just for you right here on "mad money." i'm jim cramer and i will see you tomorrow. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." another day has passed but we have very few solid answers about the boston marathon bombing. we do now know what kind of devices were used. after that, the new information is few and far between. we are going to go to boston for a live update. >>> the stock markets had a very solid bounce back today after yesterday's big selloff. gold also had a positive day. but i believe the plunge in gold is a very good sign for the economy, just as it was in the '80s and '90s. in other words, some optimism. and senator marco rubio unveils the new immigration reform bill today. here's the key point. when we look at the benefits and score them dynamically, immigration reform will be a huge boost to the economy. "the kudlow report" begins right now. >>> first up tonight, president obama will travel to boston thursday for an interfaith service with bombing victims. more than 24 hours after two bombs ripped through mar
to work with them before on cases. between the fbi and atf there's probably no better lab. as jim will tell you, when a bomb goes off, it may get blown to bits, but those are bits that we can recover. that his agency and the fbi can put together. they can understand the device. and perhaps find a signature aspect to that. so we've got a forensic investigation that's going on as far as the bomb and where it went off and what it was composed of and who may have built it. we also have what you just talked about, chris, that photographic evidence. as you and i talked yesterday, i guarantee you yesterday and today there are photographs of the individual or individuals who placed those devices. we just have to separate the weak from the -- in this case the killers from the crowd and we'll know who did that. >> let me go over to mr. cavanaugh. james, it seems to me a picture dh can be blown up and stud did, what more would you want actually than someone dropping the black bag and walking away from the bomb site? >> chris, i've worked many cases over the years with no pictures at all. so
. let's bring in retired atf special agent in charge, nbc news analyst jim cavanaugh. jim, it's, it's a changing situation. but certainly it is a dramatic scene. it almost looks like a war zone, streets empty, we don't know how many officers are on the scene. but the tension seems to be remarkably high. there's some thought that perhaps dzhokah tsarnaev is holed up and is being negotiated with at this point. >> alex, that's exactly right. you know when you're in command of a situation like this, i always like to break it down to the main things that handle the main crisis points and address those. and there's three interlocking rings here that are affecting boston and the citizens. and that's what the commanders have got to focus on. one is the standoff with dzhokhar, we can talk about how that interlocks and what's going on there. the second is, the placement of another pressure cooker device in the city that they've located. and the question of are there more. and then the third interlocking circle is, whether or not there's these two accomplices, as pete williams described and ma
are in the nature of the bomb. >>> up next, abc's senior national correspondent jim avila, shows us just how far the blast from the bombs traveled. >> reporter: the killer bombs likely contained less than two pounds of common black powder explosive, says one of the nations leading ied experts. even leaving the characteristic white smoke. bombs designed to spread terror and death with a lethal blast of metal shrapnel. >> looks like he was out to kill and maim. >> reporter: hold it right there. here we see windows blown out here, but the buildings themselves are intact. what does that tell us about what this bomber wanted to do? >> that he did not want to take down the building. that wasn't his main target. it was to disrupt the marathon and kill people in that immediate area. >> reporter: houston says this is classic ied design, the kill zone from the blast, one to two yards. according to the accounts from the bomb's site, powerful enough to knock a runner off his feet ten yards away. and topple another man on his couch from the third floor of the building next door, 20 yards away. >> it looks li
has now been canceled. clearly there is internal debate. jim walsh is a international security analyst. he calls boston home and, jim, good morning to you. >> good morning. bill: just the sense of debate that is quite clear what you put out and what you don't, what do you believe about that? >> i think there are a couple of considerations law enforcement is looking at. you don't want to put out a photo if in some way that tells the culprit or suspect something that enables them, makes it more difficult for them to find. you don't want to tip them off if you don't have to. particularly with the fbi some sense of the richard jewell episode that still hangs over their heads. just because you have a suspect that doesn't mean they're guilty. by releasing the photo you increase the pressure, the public will look for the person. think i they want to get their you can it is in a row before they go public with it. we're seeing something we have never seen before, bill as i went on facebook, crowd sourcing which can be a powerful in a positive way and in a negative way. bill: what is crowd sourc
korea. jim maseda joins us from seoul. hi, jim. >> reporter: hi, kelly. well, the past 24 hours have been a pretty good example of the unpredictability of kim junk union and his scene. after all of those signals, it turned out to be a very quiet day in north korea, focused entirely on those celebrations around founding father kim jong il's birthday. but then last night, there was a sudden new threat from the north korean military, which said it would strike south korea without warning if there were another anti-north protest in the south. so this was in reaction to a very small demonstration yesterday here in downtown seoul where a couple of effigies of kim jong un were burned. in the same message, he said the south must apologize for its undig phied acts before talks could happen. despite the angry ultimatum, there does seem to be a shift now towards what they call offramping or tamping down the volume and talking rather than confrontation. that said, those two medium range missiles are reportedly on their launchers in the eastern part of north korea ready to be fired. the south is
at the same time. people can also fork out $500 to attend a joe montana autograph signing or $150 to see jim harbaugh at a stadium event. the new stadium will cost $1.2 billion when all is said and done. >>> sal, everything okay in san jose? >> yes, it is. it is a little bit slower than it was. northbound as you drive up through downtown and get into the valley, it will be slow. but we don't have any major crashes on the way. just people getting back to work and we don't have -- we don't see anything really terrible here. the traffic continues to slow on 101 as well by the way getting up to the 880 interchange. we had an earlier crash at the toll plaza. they had to get those cars out of the way. for a while, even the carpool lanes were slowing down. it does look like they've cleared the crash and the traffic is beginning to recover. southbound 880, there was a crash at the bottom of the ramp. 880, it's been causing slow traffic on the nimitz freeway. 7:38. let's go to steve. >>> clear skies, not much of a breeze. hardly anything at all. at the surface, almost everyone says calm. toughest for
of the runners representing newtown were not injuried in the explosions. >> we are hearing the audio calls. jim henley has more on the chaos and the confusion from the scene today. >> dozens of victims, bags abandoned in that chaos. blocked roadways and of course, the huge crowds. posted online, can you hear the tense moments after the explosions, as first respenders tried to get all units to the scene around the finish line. >> i want one road cleared, ambulances in and out. i need lanes open here. >> boylston, we need to set up a perimeter. get people away. >> get everybody out there. use kagz, there may be additional devices. use caution. >> i need someone on social media, let people know. we are sweeping the street to make sure it is safe. get them out once it is swept. we have all the victims off the scene. >> we are finishing the evacuation of the surrounding buildings. >> the last call, referring to an explosive sweep that lasted hours this evening n midst of everything, you hear for a call at the jfk library, that turned out to be an unrelated fire. many in the marathon crowd that tried
phones with them. >> reporter: people are glued to the tv coverage. jim adams managed to get a hold of the entire team in boston. >> you could hear the chaos starting to build with people in the background calling out have you seen my friend, my relatives. >> it's a horrifying situation up there. >> reporter: lee corrigan manages the baltimore running festival, a qualifier for the boston marathon. 30,000 spectators usually gather here. they can expect to see heightened security this year. >> we are no stranger to this. the first marathon occurred a month after 9-11. so, we are at a heightened state of alert. >> reporter: an emergency operation center is set up at m&t stadium as 400 officers patrol the race course. the members could arrive in the wake of what happened in boston. we learned the u.s. naval academy marathon team, all members are safe and accounted for. meghan mccorkell, wjz, eyewitness news. >> thank you. >>> three people are confirmed dead, one an 8-year-old boy. more than 140 people are injured. federal and local authorities are searching an apartment of someone they
, mother jones has new research. this is shocking, jim. you will be shocked. new research confirms gun rampages are rising and armed civilians don't stop them. okay. we'll get to that. all of that stuff. >> stephanie: all of the stuff we've been talking about. because people like to say they don't have any -- yes we have facts! and statistics. all right. we'll get to all of that as we continue. 17 minutes after the hour. people carbonite. why? huh? why wouldn't you have carbonite just for the peace of mind alone. these days, everything we know or have is in our computers financial documents creative stuff, your music. >> videos. >> stephanie: right? you're busy. hard to remember stuff like that to back stuff up. remember you had to keep backing up. >> on floppy disks. >> stephanie: all the time. carbonite online back-up hassle free to back up your files. it backs up files to the cloud automatically and continuously when you're connected to the internet. carbonite does all of the work for you you don't have to remember to do it again. carbonite has a back-up plan that's right for you. $
durbin of illinois. >> suarez: and we sit down with the head of the world bank, jim yong kim, about his new push to tackle extreme poverty around the globe. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion
and jim cramer. >> good morning, jim. >> lots to talk about. we account talk about boston and the impact on the market. i would love to hear your view on the psychology there, but also coca cola there. goldman sachs, j&j, we had good numbers. >> coca-cola doesn't have to say anything positive and people absolutely lap it up as they've done for all of the consumer products company and everies single one whereas, goldman sachs they just put a single boilerplate line about what everybody knows which is the macro environment and you're supposed to throw the stock out. i think that is a mistake, and i think the book value is for real. j & j is blessed. he's making it better. j & j and coca-cola, andrew, after boston, hey, you what? i'm take them. it's after boston. boston signifies the psychological terror that people feel when they buy anything other than what's in the supermarket. >> we were talking, i think in the 6:00 hour about sort of is this going to be a major psychological shift that people have come out and says not only a huge tragedy, but it will change the way people think about
if he had anything. he led a terrific team. then asa. >> thank you, jim. for all societies behaved differently under stress. at those times, they may even take action that conflicts with their its central character and values. that is what we did here. we were under stress. we took actions that conflict with who we are. who we are called to be and who we have committed to be. then we spent about 10 years not being willing to face the truth about it. often by covering what happened with euphemisms and an awful lot of secrets. i believe our detainee task force is revealing where we strayed from our values by shining the light of investigation and analysis on the problem, in the hope the next time we are under that stress, we do not go down the day -- the same road. has been an honor to serve on this panel. >> thank you. >> just in terms of new things, everyone here discussed the general contents of the report, the most important thing. there are some new points raised in the reports discussion on the role of the international red cross, and the debate inside the organization. we had
period. how about jim demint who helped marco rubio win his seat. he said, quote, after decades of empty promises congress similar similarly lacks credibility to keep its promises. after strategies and plans for enforcement years later he's not buying it, and he's basically saying, vote against this. so let's bring in our conservative expert noah rothman. how is this going on the conservative side? are they going to get another votes to pass it or is it going to be blocked? >> i have no idea what the congress is going to do just yet. we only begun the selling process. i would imagine the gang of eight wants this passed so badly. the republicans want a political victory and democrats want an immigration reform i think it will be passed in congress but i think it will be troubling to pass it by the conservatives to say the least. they have been doing great work by identifying problems that are in this proposal, and a lot of it has to do with the enforcement provisions only being implemented. as far as the process has been implemented, it can be tied up in the course has to be implemented
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
in trying to find these potential suspects and whittle down the information? >> piggyback what jim said, the tremendous amount of information. it's really hard to conceptualize how much is going on, how many streams of information are coming in. big part of it right now, of course, lining up witnesses with all the data that's available. digital and analog. and identifying people, timeline, sequences. who was here, egress routes? as far as facial recognition system, i've been out of the government now for about 18 months, and before that, there were huge leaps in technology and biometrics and facial recognition system. i can imagine now the state-of-the art is that much further along. i'm sure it will be a big part in helping identify. >> when we talk about this mounds and mounds of evidence, it's really two different crime scenes essentially. we had two bomb sites. are they treating each of these independently or look for commonalities between the two? >> absolutely on the commonalities. think of it in terms of one major crime scene, death scene here, with some of the best technicians i
-americans and other people of color in the jim crow not just south of the north to map. >> in my book i talk about confronting and discussing with the president of "msnbc" in 2010 about pat buchanan and him being on that channel and saying you have a guy who is essentially friendly with white separatist, friendly with white supremacists. he has written a book that says america's diversity is its downfall. why is this guy in your channel? he said zero code you know he has a point of view that we should feature. ..
reform was being debated former senator jim demint from south carolina told his colleagues the need to vote against obama cared cared we need to break the obama administration. senator mcconnell for senate majority leader from the republicans announcing in 2010 that his highest priority, the senate majority leader was making barack obama the one-term president. if we had a coalition presidency were each party would elect a partner it wouldn't stand to gain as much clinical opposition. no matter what they did it was still share the white house with the other party so then it would be much freer to judge legislative proposals on their merits. so to put it another way, it's not surprising when you have a winner-take-all election for presidency whose power has grown to a level of the presidency you shouldn't be surprised that we have high levels of partisan conflict. indeed if you go back the increase in partisan conflict, to go back to the 50s and 60's there is much more of a cross party lines. if you look at partisan conflict graph it has risen since the 40s in the 50s grassley to lev
jihadist. we'll show you that video and ask our security analyst jim walsh what all of this means. we had never used a contractor before and didn't know where to start. at angie's list, you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare written by people just like you. no company can pay to be on angie's list, so you can trust what you're reading. angie's list is like having thousands of close neighbors where i can go ask for personal recommendations. that's the idea. before you have any work done, check angie's list. from roofers to plumbers to dentists and more, angie's list -- reviews you can trust. i love you, angie. sorry, honey. twenty-five thousand mornings, give or take, is all we humans get. we spend them on treadmills. we spend them in traffic. and if we get lucky, really lucky, it dawns on us to go spend them in a world where a simple sunrise can still be magic. twenty-five thousand mornings. make sure some of them are pure michigan. your trip begins at michigan.org. yeah, i'm looking to save, but i'm not sure which policy is right for me. you should try our cover
joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim -- the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spaulding and the heritage foundation itself so valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case on conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, in outspoken partisanship is what almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on both sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. but negativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that liberals are for things, and conse
promise to find it just for you right here on "mad money." i'm jim cramer. thank you, everybody. see you tomorrow! >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." let's get started right away. the big story today a shocking but fake tweet and from the associated press and set off a steep stock market selloff and then just as suddenly, a stock market rebound. what on earth happened? cnbc's own eamon javers joins us with this incredible story. good evening. >> it was a really bizarre turn of events starting at 1:07:00 p.m. here's the tweet that the a.p. account put out at that minute. it said, "breaking" two explosions in the white house and barack obama is injured. that was a fake report as a result of a hack attack against the a.p. twitter account. but it set off this reaction in the dow jones industrial average, as you see from the chart, a huge spike down on that news. down about 143 points at the bottom. and then bouncing right back up, all of that happening within the space of about three minutes. and by sheer coincidence, the white house briefing was set t
happens or something happens and then they win and they're in for life. tom foley, jim howard of new jersey. these guys and women have the guts to run an impossible -- that is what is so inspiring. she could be a congresswoman for life in the wrong district. politically she is probably too moderate but your thoughts. >> here's the thing. one of the reasons the republican campaign committee must be just tearing its hair out is that this was another race that republicans have essentially given away because they have a bad candidate. it's like todd aiken in missouri. these are races republicans should have won but they had bad candidates and you know at first the campaign committee was going to go ahead with it, give mark sanford money. he's at least well known. he may be, you know, he served as governor twice. he's got the politics that seem to fit that district but he is also an idiot. let me say this in his wife's defense. remember that mark sanford came to her to ask her to run his campaign this time around after publicly humiliating her with another woman. for all of his alleged po
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning that we want to hit some of the highlights. we hope he will take the entire report, study it through and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i looked back in history to the time during world war ii that we in turn to some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do but in light of history, it was an error. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american
30 victims who were missing a limb. abc's jim avila reports on how this tragedy unfolded. >> reporter: two hours after the winners crossed, 4:09 into the race, the amateur runners still filling boston's boylston street, two rapid-fire explosions at the finish line. >> something just blew up! [ explosion ] >> run! go! >> reporter: turning the cherished boston marathon into what one hospital official called a war zone. >> i crossed the 26-mile marker and i saw the first explosion happen. there was some commotion. i saw a fire and smoke. and i didn't know what it was. and then from about me to where that gentleman is standing over there, i literally saw the garbage barrel explode. i saw the flash, the fire, the smoke, and i just ran as fast as i could. >> reporter: cameras were rolling from many angles as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least within of the marathoners. look again. most of the injuries, though, suffered by spectators who came to celebrate the finish. >> a bomb went off. and it knocked me to the ground. and then, you know, everybody started running, panickin
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
gifford has an op ed this morning. jim is a republican. what you think about what the senate did? we havehere in delaware plenty of gun laws. sure that is the case in a lot places in the country where somebody gets arrested with a gun crime, usually they are able to eliminate that. they do not prosecute for illegal guns. there are plenty of guns laws already. it is just a matter of having the prosecutors have in the nerve to enforce these laws. this is just another attempt by the federal government to disarm the people of the united states and it is not going to make any favorites. lot of this is a distraction from the economy and the fact they refuse to do anything to cut back on the sides of the government. host: are you a gun owner? caller: i do not own a gun but pretty much everyone else i know owns a gun. -- here ins castle new castle, a lot of people did not have guns. guns start leaking out towards this area. people are very open a round here about gun under ship. about gun ownership. are there any further regulations you would support on gun buying? isler: no, i just think it
thing in the world can happen to a city and dumb sportscasters will go, three hours, jim, this city forget there was a nuclear blast. >> something different was going on there. >> here, it can only happen in boston because boston is a one sports team town. at the end of the day, the sox that pull the entire team together. >> fenway. >> and fenway, the cathedral to a city. it had to be an amazing day there. >> it was. it was an amazingly emotional afternoon. it was a cathartic moment. a baseball game happened to have been played but it was if a tiny basilica on the back bay and the region was attracted to it. the suspected suspect had been successfully captured the evening before. neil diamond called the red sox switchboard. >> are you kidding me? >> called the red sox switchboard and said i'm in town, my name is neil diamond. i'd like to come and sing the song and he showed up. >> wow. >> to the surprise -- >> which, of course, people are watching that don't know, that's been a tradition. >> yeah, for a long, long time, many years. middle of the eighth inning, they sing it. >> it's
your bank of america stock or selling it? here to discuss this, jim senegal, financial services analyst from "morningstar". thank you for joining us. what do you think of the report in the first place? banks manipulate the numbers for instance, moving loan-loss reserves over to the balance sheet. other banks have done that. can we believe numbers and are banks worse perhaps than we believe with bank of america? >> bank of america did release some reserves. that is something all the banks are doing. it is something i don't think a lot of investors look at. there is some help to the bottom line there. other than that it was a pretty clean quarter, asking considering all of the unusual charges for bank of america has had in the past few years. i think the problem is, the earnings really aren't anything to get excited about. even though bank of america's problems are receding into the past they're still not making a lot of money and a lot of that has to do with the macroeconomic environment. adam: when you talk about problems receding into the past, the big problem would be countrywide. i t
went off. former atf bomb investigator jim cavanaugh says it's obvious. >> large injuries were on the side of it, debris field to the left. some protected areas over on the right side that indicate the blast was to the one side of the trash receptacle. this was the scene of the blast. >> the fbi is considering publicly showing the pictures of the men they're looking for, and may do so later at a news conference today. >> pete, thank you very much. >>> drenching rain overnight in chicago. al? >> there are states of emergency throughout much of northern illinois into central illinois, because of the flooding they've gotten, the dan ryan expressway. it's a real mess there. chicago o'hare airport picking up over 4 inches of rain in the last 3 hours. in fact, airport reporting the terminal has actually had water on the floor. it's been flooding in there. still more heavy rain making its way through chicago today. it's going to continue to come down. we have flawed flood warnings much through missouri and illinois, and we're also looking for rainfall amounts anyway anyway to what the
.s. chief national correspondent jim angle tells us money, power and influence are on the line. >> experienced with terrorists here at home, the u.s. is trying to avoid encouraging them overseas, as secretary of state john kerry arrived in turkey where he plans to announce an increase in not only aid to the syrian rebels of up to $10 million. as he empty with syrian opposition leader, the memories of boston were still fresh on his mind. and he spread his sorrow. before offering more aid to syrian rebel, the u.s. wants assurances that any new government would be democratic and inclusive. in other words, not dominated by radical islamists as he explained to congress this week. >> obviously there are dangers of extremists who are finding some funding and engaged in the battle and we want to try to separate them, if that is possible. >> u.s. aid would include military items such as body armor, communications equipment, and night vision goggles. but not weapons or ammunition. syrian opposition groups were there to demand more help from the international community. they argue the as
was then the news hour and now is the news hour with jim lair all the way. when you listen to the program you're going to get both sides. so we completely identify with the approach of u.s.a. today. but we live today i think all of us recognize in a much more partisan bitter maybe too strong a word but i think it fits in many ways. and some people say well it goes back to the election of 2000 and it's the war in iraq but i think it's more than that. i've seen it -- i was at cnn for 12 years, and you see it as you say in the e-mails you get from people. some people just are never are just not going to be happy. the thing that's reassuring to me though is that you get 150 e-mails from people saying you were tilting too far one way and you tilted too far the other way. and you want to be down the middle and you're going to get that kind of reaction. my question is though does it -- you know, we need to have a healthy debate about these issues but do you want people to be at each other's throats? and i think that's some of what's going on right now. and i think that's something we ought to contin
that an agreement and all the responsibility for the gaza strip and hamas? >> good question. >> jim, the microphone is coming. >> good to see you again. as you knoi m believer in when yowritwhen you said d so forgive me for what i'm about to say that i'm very frustrated middle east peace activist for those of you that money i've been involved in this for over 23 years trying to organize the churches in this area and have spoken in other parts of the country as well. so, with that in mind please forgive me because this is a harsh question you as well as everyone in this room i think you are all living in a fantasy and i am, too and here is the problem. in your presentation, you talked about the arab street and how connected they are and you're absolutely right. but you didn't with the public opinion in this country. you have got to. we are democracy and we are not disconnected from the public opinion. when you look as i have done at public opinion onisrael and palestine for the last 20 years, guess what, over 50% of americans support israel. less than 10% with a few exceptions, the war was one of th
. and we got a hundred dollars in points from sears to use on jim's mower... hold the phone! ...and points from the grill helped pay for my dress... now you're just pulling my leg. get this, sometimes points just show up in our account. get out of town! with points from shop your way there are more ways to save than ever at sears. oh and this bracelet... i used points to get it for free. yeah, right. and i'm married to lorenzo lamas. hola. this is how to save. this is sears. a 12-year-old fr >>> good morning everyone. it's 7:56. your headlines on this tuesday morning statement-year-old boy is among those recovering from injuries from the explosions in boston. he was hit in the leg. he is due for more surgery. he was at the marathon finish line cheering on his mother who was in the race. >>> -year-old girl is dead, the victim of a fire in san jose overnight. it began around 11:30 last night. investigators say the fire was at a converted living location. it's a small unit the back of a standard home. her 4-year-old sister is now being treated for injuries as well. >
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there are more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those. we hope you will take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it is important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history durling the time to -- during the time to world war ii that we intered some japanese americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. in the right of history, it was an error. so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in some of the post 9/11 environment. there are key questions we want to answer this morning. one, did the treatment rise to torture? secondly, how did it happen? what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found u.s. personnel in many instances used ininterrogation techniques on detainees that constitutional torture. military personnel conducted cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment. both c
be calls for negotiation with this government. bear in mind that these are all legitimize jim jong un's rule. whatever else they do, they are a signal to home that this guy has engainled the outside world on his own terms. it reads very well back home. of course the north koreaian side wants face-saving solutions. given his calculations and the circumstances of this state, i submit that kim jong un and company can stand to lose a little face when they play this way. they deserve to, and if we are smart, we will range that outcome dwsharge that outcome every time we have a pleasant situation like this. thank you. >> thank you. my lane in the road is south korea. south korea's approach, military reform since 2010. it will be perhaps a bit more tactical. cumulatively, south korea is much more likely to respond to a clash. i think the situation has changed not only in the blue house but in the lay of the land as well as the political landscape. first of all, the new south koreaian president has vowed publicly and in private to respond forcibly and really exponentially, the next time nort
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
by retiring senator jim bunting. he won decisively in the general. when he got to the senate, he quickly founded the tea party caucus. finally, for you breakfast tea party buff, a group of which i may be the only member, of our nearly 3800 breakfasts, only two times have we had both a father and a son as guests. we hosted former representative ron paul in september 2011. the only other father/son team was mitt romney and his dad, michigan governor george romney. so much for biography and breakfast trivia. now on to mechanical manners. as always, we're on the record. please, no live blogging or tweeting, in short, no filing of any kind while the breakfast is underway. there's no embargo when the breakfast is over except that c-span has agreed to the to use video of the session for at least an hour after the breakfast ends to give those of us in the room a chance to file. if you'd like to ask a question, please, do the traditional thing and send me a subtle, nonthreatening signal, and i'll happily call. we'll start off by offering our guest the opportunity to make some opening comments. an
, called it pure am necessary tifment jim sharp, a talk show host in phoenix promised that arizonans are still not taking this sitting down. on denny schaffer's show in new orleans, callsers demanded deportations. quote, i see nothing wrong with putting them on a bus and shipping them back to wherever they came from. a caller named alan told mr. schaffer, the law's the law. the senators filed their 844-page bill after 2:00 a.m. on wednesday. officially beginning what president obama and other supporters hope will be six-week effort to pass it in the senate by early june. hearings on the legislation, which tightens border security and offers an eventual path to citizenship, are set to begin on friday. that's from the "washington times." jacksonville, north carolina. arlene, good morning. democrat. caller: good morning. the gun background check situation. tammy baldwin was just on and she said something very interesting, she said, we already have background checks. so what's wrong with going a little bit more? and that's the problem. the problem is, you can't have a little bit. ce you
activated and incident management assistant jim, three preliminary damage assessment teams, and we are also standing by to assist in any other way. our eoc remains at level three, which is at increased readiness. we will continue to monitor the events over the course of the day and provide you with updates as they are relevant. i might add, mr. chairman, that many of the things i've just gone through are examples of the kinds of activities that have been supported by the committee, through fema, through the various grants that we supply, search and rescue being a good example of the kinds of things that grants have been supporting increasing our capacity for response and resilience as a nation. so that is the most recent on west, texas. with respect to boston, we are, we are investi this as an act of terror. we ae assisting. ice is part of the jttf. we have over four dozen ice agents now assigned to the boston office helping in the investigation. cdp is assisting in a number of tays immediately after the we work to close logan, the ground air for a few hours and to institute special targeti
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